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Randolph Lee — “Echoes of Zion” (Mark Masters Series, 2022)

Abstract:

In crafting my latest album, “Echoes of Zion,” I sought to embark on a profound journey honoring the pioneers of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints and their invaluable cultural and musical legacy. This endeavor represents not merely an artistic expression but a heartfelt homage to the unyielding faith and resilience of those who, through their unwavering commitment, shaped the cultural narrative of a bygone era.

The inaugural notes of the album resonate with a distinctive rendition of the hymn “Come, Come, Ye Saints/All is Well,” where my trumpet takes center stage, accompanied by the University of Florida Choir under the masterful direction of Willard Kesling. This unique interpretation, enhanced by a piccolo trumpet cadenza, sets the tone for a poignant and emotive journey, intertwining my personal connection with the historical narrative.

As the pioneers reach Union Square, the composition “Home! Sweet Home!” for the UF Wind Symphony, orchestrated by John Laverty and conducted by David Waybright, encapsulates the profound sense of warmth and belonging experienced by those pioneers who established new lives in the American West. This track serves as a musical tapestry, weaving together the deep emotions associated with the pioneers’ courageous journey and the establishment of their newfound home.

Delving into the rich history of the Nauvoo Brass Band, the album further explores their commitment to artistic expression through the performance of Haydn’s Trumpet Concerto in E-flat Major, featuring collaboration with members of the UF Wind Symphony. This musical interplay provides a window into the soundscape that might have accompanied the pioneers on their arduous trek, offering a glimpse into the harmonious and challenging aspects of pioneer society. The album concludes with a poignant performance of “The Trumpet Shall Sound,” delivered by bass-baritone Tony Offerle and accompanied by a chamber ensemble. This rare glimpse into the first documented complete performance of Handel’s Messiah in the region serves as a testament to the enduring legacy of pioneer musical history, seamlessly bridging the gap between eras and preserving the timeless essence of our musical heritage.

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Publication date:

ISSN: 2792-8349

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International Journal of Music

As I reflect on the creation of my latest album, “Echoes of Zion,” I am reminded of the profound journey undertaken by the early members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints as they forged their path to the American West. This musical odyssey serves not only as an artistic expression but also as a heartfelt homage to the unwavering faith and resilience of those pioneers who contributed to shaping the cultural tapestry of a bygone era.

The inaugural notes of the album resound with a rendition of the timeless hymn “Come, Come, Ye Saints/All is Well.” As a trumpeter deeply connected to the historical narrative, I sought to infuse this quintessential LDS Pioneer Hymn with my own interpretation. The addition of a piccolo trumpet cadenza and descant part, accompanied by the University of Florida Choir under the direction of Willard Kesling, sets the stage for the poignant and emotive journey that unfolds.

The musical expedition continues as the pioneers reach Union Square, commemorated through the evocative track “Home! Sweet Home!” Orchestrated for the UF Wind Symphony by John Laverty and conducted by David Waybright, this piece encapsulates the profound sense of warmth and belonging experienced by the pioneers as they established their new lives in the American West.

Delving into the rich history of the Nauvoo Brass Band, the album explores their commitment to artistic expression amidst challenging circumstances. The performance of Haydn’s Trumpet Concerto in E-flat Major, alongside members of the UF Wind Symphony, provides a glimpse into the kind of music that may have accompanied the pioneers on their arduous journey.

The interplay between the Nauvoo Brass Band and Dominico Ballo’s band unfolds in a friendly competition, vividly portrayed in the rendition of “O My Father” set to Stephen Foster’s “Gentle Annie.” This beautiful collaboration, performed by the UF Faculty Brass Quartet and piano, captures the intricate intersection of sacred and secular music that defined pioneer society.

Further exploring the musical landscape of pioneer life, the album presents the lively rendition of “Fisher’s Hornpipe.” With the incorporation of guitars and an e-flat cornet, this track emanates festivity, offering a vibrant snapshot of the frontier dances that once brought joy and camaraderie to the pioneers.

Before the introduction of church organs, orchestras played a pivotal role in pioneer services. The Deseret Philharmonic Society, formed in 1855, aimed to perform masterworks by renowned composers. This influence is poignantly remembered through the touching performance of Handel’s “Dead March from Saul” by Naples Brass, directed by Steve DeLauderante.

The album culminates in the exquisite performance of “The Trumpet Shall Sound” by bass-baritone Tony Offerle, accompanied by a chamber ensemble. This piece provides a rare glimpse into the first documented complete performance of Handel’s Messiah in the region—a momentous occasion in pioneer musical history.

In a modern twist, I chose to conclude the album with “Carnival of American Pie,” a reinterpretation that melds Arban’s classic “Carnival of Venice” with Don McLean’s “American Pie.” This contemporary adaptation serves as a testament to the enduring legacy of pioneer music, seamlessly transitioning between eras while preserving the essence that defines our musical heritage.

Conclusion

In conclusion, “Echoes of Zion” is more than an album to me; it is a heartfelt tribute to the pioneers’ cultural and musical contributions. Through meticulous research, passionate performances, and a personal connection to the historical narrative, this album stands as a valuable addition to the preservation of the pioneer era’s musical legacy. It serves as a poignant reminder of the timeless power of music to connect us with our history and roots—a testament to the enduring spirit of those who paved the way for our artistic and cultural endeavors.

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