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Randolph Lee: “There Is a Relationship Between Singing and Playing and It Is Very Different Than Just Blowing Lots of Air”

Abstract:

This interview with musician Randolph Lee provides a comprehensive exploration of his musical journey as a trumpeter, tracing his roots from a musical family in San Diego, CA, to his diverse experiences in professional engagements and pedagogical pursuits. The narrative delves into his early influences, highlighting his familial connections with the Mormon Tabernacle Choir and his formative years under the guidance of his father and trumpet teacher Jay Posteraro. Lee recounts his educational trajectory, from attending the San Diego School of Creative and Performing Arts to his undergraduate and graduate studies at Brigham Young University, UCLA, and Arizona State University.

The interview unveils Lee’s methodological preferences in teaching and practicing, emphasizing a vocal approach influenced by the teachings of William Adam and Louis Davidson. Lee discusses his daily trumpet routine, offering insights into his focused morning sessions on fundamentals and afternoon sessions dedicated to repertoire. The musician details his instrument choices, utilizing Cannonball trumpets and Pickett mouthpieces, while also highlighting his use of unconventional equipment, notably right-handed trumpets despite being left-handed. Lee extends an invitation to prospective students, detailing his commitment to fostering efficiency and musicality in their playing.

Lee shares valuable perspectives on common challenges faced by young trumpet players today, addressing issues such as excessive air usage and inherited low brass techniques. The interview concludes with an exploration of an exercise inspired by Julius Kosleck’s teachings, emphasizing the artistic connection between blowing and singing, providing a glimpse into Lee’s pedagogical philosophy grounded in an understanding of the intricate affinity between wind instruments and the human voice. As the interview unfolds, Randolph Lee emerges as a seasoned musician and dedicated educator, offering a wealth of insights into his musical odyssey and pedagogical approach.

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Publication date:

ISSN: 2792-8349

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International Journal of Music